Sep
22
Thu
Max Fraser Speaks on “Hillbilly Revanche: Trump and Sanders in Southern Appalachia” @ Torian Room, duPont Library, University of the South campus
Sep 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Max Fraser Speaks on "Hillbilly Revanche: Trump and Sanders in Southern Appalachia" @ Torian Room, duPont Library, University of the South campus | Sewanee | Tennessee | United States
Max Fraser, Ph.D. Candidate in American History at Yale University, will speak on “Hillbilly Revanche: Trump and Sanders in Southern Appalachia” on Thursday, September 22nd at 7 PM in the Torian Room of duPont Library. The lecture is sponsored by the University’s Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies.
In his talk, Fraser looks at the extraordinary 2016 political season from the perspective of Southern Appalachia, where two outsider candidates have had remarkable success tapping into the political disaffection of white working class constituencies across the region. Providing context that has been lacking from much of the media coverage of the presidential campaigns, Fraser examines the deep roots of that political disaffection in the historical figure of the “hillbilly”, America’s perennially maladjusted and problematic white poor. Turning to the present, he argues that the “hillbilly revanche” of 2016 is no passing phenomenon, and that the unrest and resentment roiling through Southern Appalachia should make it one of the more politically tempestuous regions in the country for years to come.
Max Fraser is completing a Ph.D. in American history at Yale University. He previously worked as a journalist covering politics and the economy for The Nation and other magazines. His dissertation, “The Hillbilly Highway: A Social History of Transappalachia, 1918-1974” traces the inter-regional connections between the rural south and the industrial Midwest, and examines the roots of the conservative turn of the postwar white working class. Fraser has presented his dissertation research at numerous conferences and public fora, including the 2016 Graduate Conference of the American Political History Institute at Boston University, where he was awarded the “Outstanding Paper” prize. Buildling on his dissertation research, Fraser is developing a a permanent, publicly-accessible, multi-purpose archival repository and teaching resource devoted to first-person accounts of migration between Southern Appalachia and the industrial Midwest; this effort is being supported in part by the Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies.
Oct
7
Fri
Proposal Deadline: 40th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference EXTREME Appalachia!
Oct 7 @ 5:00 pm – 5:00 pm

40th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference

EXTREME Appalachia!

March 9-12, 2017
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia

The 2017 Program Committee invites proposals for panels, papers, posters, roundtables, performances, workshops, or organizing sessions. Papers and posters should feature original unpublished work in progress. The full call for participation with details for online submission will go out August 15. Scholarships are available. Deadline for proposals is October 1, 2016, with the preliminary program announced in December 2016.

“Extreme Appalachia” is the theme for the 40th annual Appalachian Studies Conference. By “extreme” we mean the impassioned commitments people have to the region, the land, and Appalachian communities, ways of life, and livelihoods. We mean the ways extreme economics—excessive resource extraction and use, underfunding of public education and services, and dismal job opportunities—have sparked community resilience and activism that advance a sustainable future for the region. “Extreme Appalachia” also references exploitative pop culture products like reality television programming—as well as the countering power of the region’s visual, performance, and literary arts to nurture, provoke, and inspire. In the face of extremity, regionalist scholarship continues to augment ongoing struggles for racial, social, economic, and environmental justice.

The 2017 Program Committee invites proposals for panels, papers, posters, roundtables, performances, workshops, or organizing sessions. Papers and posters should feature original unpublished work in progress. The full call for participation with details for online submission will go out August 15. Scholarships are available. Deadline for proposals is October 1, 2016, with the preliminary program announced in December 2016.

Conference highlights

  • Keynote by Dr. James Hansen, director, Program on Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions, Columbia Univ.
  • Dori Freeman, southwest Virginia singer/songwriter inspired by bluegrass, rhythm & blues, and old country
  • Pre-conference grassroots activism training and intergenerational organizing workshop by Virginia Organizing
  • “Extreme Appalachia! Rage and Renewal” plenary designed by Barbara Ellen Smith and Steve Fisher

Virginia Tech – For the first time since 1994, the conference will be held on the Blacksburg campus of Virginia Tech. Blacksburg is located in the Ridge and Valley province of Appalachia, close to the Appalachian Trail, and 40 miles from the Blue Ridge escarpment and Roanoke, Virginia. Within easy day trips are the bituminous coalfields of southern West Virginia and far southwest Virginia, the Blue Ridge Parkway, Natural Bridge, the New River Gorge, and Mountain Lake nature preserve. Virginia Tech was created as Virginia’s land grant college in 1872. In the 1970s and 1980s it became a co-ed university supporting regional activism alongside Blacksburg local B. Lloyd, director of the Appalachian Peoples’ Service Organization. Jean Haskell and Betty Fine founded the Appalachian Studies minor at VT in 1985, and nearly all units on campus engage in regional research.


Solitude, home of Appalachian Studies @ VT

For further information:

Conference Chair: Anita Puckett,apuckett@vt.edu, (540) 231-9526

Program Chair: Emily Satterwhite,satterwhite@vt.edu, (540) 231-8779

Local Arrangements Chair: Serena Frost

Community Liaison: Andy Morikawa

Program Committee: Beth Bingman, Theresa Burriss, Susan Clark, Joy Gritton, Tony Harkins, Karen Hudson, Bob Hutton, Jennifer Herald Koster, Doug Reichert Powell, and Barbara Ellen Smith

The mission of the Appalachian Studies Association is to promote and engage dialogue, research, scholarship, education, creative expression, and action among a diverse and inclusive group of scholars, educators, practitioners, grassroots activists, students, individuals, groups and institutions. Our mission is driven by our commitment to foster quality of life, democratic participation and appreciation of Appalachian experiences regionally, nationally and internationally.

Nov
7
Mon
Healthcare Access and the Legacy of the Miners’ Memorial Hospital Association in Southern Appalachia @ Torian Room, DuPont Library
Nov 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Healthcare Access and the Legacy of the Miners’ Memorial Hospital Association in Southern Appalachia @ Torian Room, DuPont Library | Sewanee | Tennessee | United States
Embodying Modernity: Healthcare Access and the Legacy of the Miners’ Memorial Hospital Association in Southern Appalachia
Who: Maya Sandler, Ph.D Student, History of Medicine, Yale University
Description: Building on her research into the development of a group of hospitals for Appalachian coal miners in the 1950s, Sandler will consider how healthcare became a marker of urban modernity for Appalachia, and subsequently, how the lack of healthcare in the region has become an emblem of intractable “other”-ness. The history of these hospitals complicates understandings of federal intervention into rural Appalachia, and suggests that the infrastructural landscape was hardly as skeletal as the government portrayed. Sandler contends that echoes of this story continue to resonate today, as the material impacts of the Affordable Care Act are hotly debated, and communities struggle to seek out the care they have long been promised.
 
When: 7:00 pm Monday, November 7, 2016
Where: The Torian Room, DuPont Library (178 Georgia Ave.)
Parking: Visitor parking is available in the lot adjacent to the library.
Nov
9
Wed
Leadership, Identity, and Social Change @ McGriff Alumni House
Nov 9 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Leadership, Identity, and Social Change @ McGriff Alumni House | Sewanee | Tennessee | United States

This conversation is the first in a series sponsored by the Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies and the Brown Foundation Fellowship.

Who: Martin (Marty) Rodgers, Office Managing Director, Accenture Washington, DC Metro Office
Description: Marty is the Office Managing Director for Accenture’s Washington, D.C. Metro Office as well as the Executive Director of the firm’s Nonprofit Group and International Public Sector Practice. He is an international leader in the community service, workforce skills, and social impact fields. Following his talk titled, Leadership, Identity and Social Change, there will be an opportunity to engage in conversation with Marty and Karen Proctor, our Advent Semester Brown Foundation Fellow.
When: 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 9, 2016
Where: McGriff Alumni House (Georgia Ave.)
Parking: Visitor parking is available in the lot adjacent to the library. 
Nov
17
Thu
Leading Change, Stories from the Field @ McGriff Alumni House
Nov 17 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Leading Change, Stories from the Field @ McGriff Alumni House | Sewanee | Tennessee | United States
This conversation is the second in a series sponsored by the Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies and the Brown Foundation Fellowship.
Leading Change, Stories from the Field
a talk and conversation with Karen Proctor
Advent 2016 Brown Foundation Fellow, Founder and Principal of Harbour Workshop, Senior Fellow at Babson College’s Lewis Institute for Social Innovation
Thursday, November 17
4:30 pm at McGriff Alumni House

Karen is founder and principal of Harbour Workshop LLC, a social innovation firm. She established the firm to help social impact leaders and organizations design solutions for lasting social change. Karen’s career has been devoted to working across the public and private sectors to address issues ranging from hunger to school reform. She has been the chief social responsibility administrator and strategist for global corporations including the National Basketball Association and Scholastic. A nationally recognized leader in the social impact space, Karen has advised corporate CEOs, non-profit, and philanthropic chief executives, as well as federal and state senior level officials. She is currently a senior fellow with Babson College’s Lewis Institute for Social Innovation. Karen is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame.

Dec
7
Wed
Leading Change, Strengthening Sewanee: Views from the Community @ McGriff Alumni House
Dec 7 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

This conversation is the third in a series sponsored by the Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies and the Brown Foundation Fellowship.

Leading Change, Strengthening Sewanee: Views from the Community
Student presentations and a conversation with Karen Proctor
Wednesday, December 7
4:30 pm at McGriff Alumni House

Join Karen Proctor and students from her class Collaborative Leadership and Social Change for conversation on the questions, “What are the major social issues facing the Sewanee community? What are some possible solutions for change?” Students will present the results of their course work on the questions which will be followed by a facilitated community conversation on the issues raised.

Feb
1
Wed
Manuscript Deadline: Journal of Appalachian Studies Forum on Economic Development in Appalachia
Feb 1 all-day

Call for Papers
for a Journal of Appalachian Studies Forum
On Economic Development in Appalachia

The Journal of Appalachian Studies announces a special two-year forum on sustainable economic development in Appalachia, starting with the journal’s Spring 2016 (Vol 22, No 1) issue and ending with the Fall 2017 (Vol 23, No 2) issue.

We invite the submission of manuscripts dealing with practices relevant to sustainable economic development in Appalachian communities. We will consider a wide-range of scholarship from a variety of disciplines and applied fields. Manuscripts focusing on economic development theory, empirical and/or applied research, or narrative essays on development issues will be welcome. We also seek research, which compares Appalachia to other regions in the world.

Scholars are encouraged to submit papers addressing, but not limited to, the following topics:

Tourism and development Social capital, trust, politics, and development
Infrastructure Broadband and technology
Education, labor, capital, and development Funding community and economic development
Entrepreneurship Place-based development
Local food movements Downtown development
Local currency Land ownership
Environmental capital and sustainable development Gender and development
Taxes and development The creative class in Appalachia
Vision-building Public participation methods
Health care and its effects on development Globalization
The Commons Privatization and neoliberalism
Cooperatives, non-profits, employee-owned business Credit, access to capital
Out- and in-migration and development Social change, policy and movements

The deadline for manuscripts to be considered for publication for the Spring 2016 issue is July 1, 2015. The deadline for the Fall 2016 issue is February 1, 2016; the Spring 2017 deadline is July 1, 2016; and the Fall 2017 issue deadline is February 1, 2017.

Articles should be submitted electronically to the JAS online manuscript submission portal. This secure, personalized resource will allow you to track your manuscript through each step of the review and acceptance process. To get started, and view manuscript submission guidelines, visit the Journal’s submissions page. Questions about the forum and/or the review process should be directed to the Journal’s Editor, Shaunna Scott, atshaunna.scott@uky.edu or to the Forum’s Special Editor, Will Hatcher, at william.hatcher@eku.edu.

http://appalachianstudies.org/journal/

Mar
9
Thu
40th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference EXTREME Appalachia! @ Virginia Tech
Mar 9 – Mar 12 all-day

40th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference

EXTREME Appalachia!

March 9-12, 2017
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia

“Extreme Appalachia” is the theme for the 40th annual Appalachian Studies Conference. By “extreme” we mean the impassioned commitments people have to the region, the land, and Appalachian communities, ways of life, and livelihoods. We mean the ways extreme economics—excessive resource extraction and use, underfunding of public education and services, and dismal job opportunities—have sparked community resilience and activism that advance a sustainable future for the region. “Extreme Appalachia” also references exploitative pop culture products like reality television programming—as well as the countering power of the region’s visual, performance, and literary arts to nurture, provoke, and inspire. In the face of extremity, regionalist scholarship continues to augment ongoing struggles for racial, social, economic, and environmental justice.

The 2017 Program Committee invites proposals for panels, papers, posters, roundtables, performances, workshops, or organizing sessions. Papers and posters should feature original unpublished work in progress. The full call for participation with details for online submission will go out August 15. Scholarships are available. Deadline for proposals is October 1, 2016, with the preliminary program announced in December 2016.

Conference highlights

  • Keynote by Dr. James Hansen, director, Program on Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions, Columbia Univ.
  • Dori Freeman, southwest Virginia singer/songwriter inspired by bluegrass, rhythm & blues, and old country
  • Pre-conference grassroots activism training and intergenerational organizing workshop by Virginia Organizing
  • “Extreme Appalachia! Rage and Renewal” plenary designed by Barbara Ellen Smith and Steve Fisher

Virginia Tech – For the first time since 1994, the conference will be held on the Blacksburg campus of Virginia Tech. Blacksburg is located in the Ridge and Valley province of Appalachia, close to the Appalachian Trail, and 40 miles from the Blue Ridge escarpment and Roanoke, Virginia. Within easy day trips are the bituminous coalfields of southern West Virginia and far southwest Virginia, the Blue Ridge Parkway, Natural Bridge, the New River Gorge, and Mountain Lake nature preserve. Virginia Tech was created as Virginia’s land grant college in 1872. In the 1970s and 1980s it became a co-ed university supporting regional activism alongside Blacksburg local B. Lloyd, director of the Appalachian Peoples’ Service Organization. Jean Haskell and Betty Fine founded the Appalachian Studies minor at VT in 1985, and nearly all units on campus engage in regional research.


Solitude, home of Appalachian Studies @ VT

For further information:

Conference Chair: Anita Puckett, apuckett@vt.edu, (540) 231-9526

Program Chair: Emily Satterwhite, satterwhite@vt.edu, (540) 231-8779

Local Arrangements Chair: Serena Frost

Community Liaison: Andy Morikawa

Program Committee: Beth Bingman, Theresa Burriss, Susan Clark, Joy Gritton, Tony Harkins, Karen Hudson, Bob Hutton, Jennifer Herald Koster, Doug Reichert Powell, and Barbara Ellen Smith

The mission of the Appalachian Studies Association is to promote and engage dialogue, research, scholarship, education, creative expression, and action among a diverse and inclusive group of scholars, educators, practitioners, grassroots activists, students, individuals, groups and institutions. Our mission is driven by our commitment to foster quality of life, democratic participation and appreciation of Appalachian experiences regionally, nationally and internationally.

Apr
22
Sat
Highlander Hoedown @ Old Highlander Library
Apr 22 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Apr
27
Thu
Panel discussion on Appalachian Studies Assoc. Conference @ McClurg Dining Hall, Meeting room C
Apr 27 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Panel discussion on Appalachian Studies Assoc. Conference @ McClurg Dining Hall, Meeting room C

The Collaborative for Southern Appalachian Studies and the Office of Civic Engagement sponsored several faculty, staff, and students who attended the Appalachian Studies Association Conference March 9-12, 2017 in Blacksburg, VA.

Please join us for a lunch and learn panel discussion in McClurg meeting room C on April 27th from 12:30-1:30 pm.
Panel: Dr. Daniel Carter (Environmental Studies), Dr. Paige Schneider (Politics), Emily Partin (Discover Together), and Emily Senefeld (History) presented at the conference.
Kelsey Arbuckle (C’19), Amber Layne (C’17), and Gabby Valentine (C’17) attended the conference for the first time. Each presenter/team will share briefly on their work/experience at the conference, with time for Q & A.
Faculty and staff: please sign in at the cashier’s counter and lunch is on us!