We are delighted to share some of the outcomes reported by our grant recipients. For a full listing of grant awards from 2015-16 visit this page.

  • Max Fraser (Ph.D. candidate in History at Yale) was awarded funds to “The Southern Appalachian Migration Achieve,” an ongoing oral history project devoted to preserving the experiences of Appalachian Studies and the University of the South. Click here for details.
  • John Grammar (Professor of English and Director of the School of Letters, Sewanee) and April Alvarez (Administrator for the School of Letters, Sewanee) were awarded funds to “Regional Writing, the Sense of Place, and the Rural Appalachian High School.” This program had East Tennessee novelist Amy Greene (author of Bloodroot and The Long Man) visit Sewanee, offer a reading to the college community, then conduct a writing workshop to students from Franklin and Grundy County High Schools. Click here for details.
University educators, administrators, and students at the Finding Common Ground: Ecological Pluralism on the Domain workshop

University educators, administrators, and students at the Finding Common Ground: Ecological Pluralism on the Domain workshop

  • Andrew Thompson (Ph.D from Yale, postdoctoral fellow in environmental ethics at the School of Theology) was awarded funds to “Finding Common Ground: Ecological Pluralism on the Domain.” This was a workshop-conference on conservation and pluralism on the Domain. The workshop brought together University and community participants, and is expected to contribute to management decisions about the domain and to a wider scholarly conversation on value pluralism in ecology. Click here for details.
  • Andrew Thompson (Ph.D from Yale, postdoctoral fellow in environmental ethics at the School of Theology) was awarded funds to develop a class called “Christian Social Ethics in Local Context.” The course will include at least one week focus on the local history of social actions and will also include a discussion of framing as it relates to moral decision making in community. Click here for details.
  • Michael Thompson (former Fellow at the Center for Religion and Environment), John Gatta (William B. Kenan Jr. Professor of English), and Robin Gottfried (Director of the Center for Religion and the Environment), all from Sewanee, received a grant to develop and to oversee the presentation at Sewanee of a dual-purpose symposium on “Imaginative Education: Cultivating A Sense of Place.” It would take place in late August of 2015, prior to the start of most classes. Offered in collaboration with the Berry Center of New Castle, Kentucky, the Symposium’s main purpose would be to enrich the educational substance and appeal of the overall instruction we can offer students toward the start of our FYP course on “Discovering a Sense of Place.” Click here for details.
  • Maya Sandler (Yale University doctoral student in the History of Science and Medicine) was awarded funds for a research project called, “Care Beyond the Coalfields.” Specifically examining the transfer of the Miners’ Memorial Hospital Association from the United Mine Workers of America to the Appalachian Regional Healthcare, Inc. in 1963. Click here for details. 
  • Paige Schneider (visiting assistant Professor of Politics at Sewanee) was awarded funds for “Grundy Country Post Secondary Experience Survey.” The purpose of this project is to gather data on the post secondary experiences of young adults in Grundy County. Interviews with Grundy County alum will generate data that can inform evaluations of existing programs at the high school, and the structure and content of future initiatives aimed at enhancing post secondary resources and supports on the Mountain. Click here for details. 
  • Sid Brown (Professor of Religious Studies and Chair of Religious Studies, Sewanee) was awarded funds for a project called, “Practicing Place.” In this class, students examine theories of place and ritual so that they develop lenses through which to view all the rituals of their lives. Click here for details.